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Article from St. Louis Today written by Tim Baker


 

Five years ago, Dan Beyers took his farm in a new direction. Or, rather, back in an old direction.

The Pana, Ill.-area farmer had been using corn and soybean seeds genetically modified to work with glyphosate — the generic name for Monsanto’s signature Roundup herbicide. But he reached a point at which he said it no longer made sense from a dollars standpoint.

So he turned his back on GMO crops.

“As they added more traits, we didn’t really see a yield advantage. And every time they added a trait, they added cost,” said Beyers, who also worries that GMO seeds could be damaging his soil.

Clearly the world of farming is still dominated by seeds that have been genetically altered to help them deal with drought, insects and weeds. But there’s anecdotal evidence suggesting that more farmers are considering the path Beyers has chosen.

Several factors are in play, including the premium prices that non-GMO crops — particularly soybeans — can fetch at the market. But also there is growing concern about the decreasing effectiveness of glyphosate, with farmers increasingly running into weeds that have developed resistance to the herbicide that revolutionized modern farming.

Read the rest on St. Louis Today

Golden Crops From Non-Biotech Seed

Last spring, for the first time in 20 years, Indiana farmer Jim Benham planted his fields entirely with soybean seeds that hadn’t been genetically modified to withstand herbicides.

It wasn’t because the 63-year-old suddenly had embraced the anti-GMO movement... Read the rest on the Wall Street Journal or download a scanned copy

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